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Healthcare workers in the UK and around the world are rapidly adopting new information technology tools to assist them in their work. These range from vast national networks such as the UK’s Summary Care Record service to personalised mobile applications such as the “Epocrates” medication reference “app”.

Australia’s most popular food-scanning app, FoodSwitch, has been recognised as one of the world’s top 100 innovative initiatives, selected from entries spanning more than 79 countries.

In a recent report published in the Lancet on the global dimensions of kidney disease, Professor Vivek Jha, Executive Director, George Institute India and other researchers, reported that diabetes is a major cause of this chronic illness.

Media release: 
29/05/2013

A landmark study has revealed a new way to treat intracerebral haemorrhage which stands to help millions of people worldwide. The George Institute for Global Health study found that intensive blood pressure lowering in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage, the most serious type of stroke, reduced the risk of major disability and improved chances of recovery by as much as 20 per cent.

At the invitation of the Indian Institute of Science (IISC), in Bangalore, Professor MacMahon, Principal Director of The George Institute for Global Health, addressed the faculty and students of the Biological Sciences Department at the IISc campus on 17 May 2013.

Event
Monday, 6 May, 2013 - 09:00 to Sunday, 12 May, 2013 - 17:00

We visit doctors for two main reasons: for help with issues that are causing us pain or discomfort, and less commonly, to prevent such conditions.

When we take a medicine, have a blood test, x-ray or a procedure, we expect that these will benefit us and that the benefits will outweigh any potential risks or dangers.

Media release: 
16/04/2013

Real-time social phenomenon, Twitter, can be a powerful tool to help prevent heart disease and improve health practices, according to a group of researchers affiliated with the University of Sydney. Their study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, surveying 15 international health-focused Twitter accounts, nine professional organisations and six medical journals, were selected for analysis of their Twitter growth, reach, and content.

Professor Vivekanand Jha is the Executive Director, The George Institute for Global Health, India, and James Martin Fellow at The George Institute for Global health at the University of Oxford. Prior to joining The George Institute, he was Professor of Nephrology and Head, Department of Translational Regenerative Medicine and Officer-In-Charge, Medical Education and Research Cell at the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research in Chandigarh, India.

Wherever there is human activity there is misconduct. In regard to scientific research works, since research is a global activity research misconduct is no doubt a worldwide problem.

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