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Media release: 
11/06/2018
STOP CKDu Chandrababu Naidu

A high-level review meeting of STOP CKDu: Study to Test, Operationalize Preventive approaches for Chronic Kidney Disease of Unknown Etiology was held at the Secretariat of the Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Shri Chandra Babu Naidu on June 9, 2018.

Soumyadeep Bhaumik is a Research Fellow at the George Institute for Global Health. He has studied medicine at Bankura Sammilani Medical College, India and international public health at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.

Dr Shobhana Nagraj, a doctoral student with The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford, has been awarded a prestigious Clinical Research Training Fellowship by the UK’s Medical Research Council.

"My work is intended to empower community health workers and primary care physicians to work together to detect, refer and manage pregnant women who are at increased risk of heart disease and stroke.  The technology is a tool to achieve this collaborative approach, and to strengthen the health system in rural areas. "

A new paper published in the Lancet recently used the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016) to assess personal health-care access and quality with the Healthcare Access and Quality (HAQ) Index for 195 countries and territories, as well as subnational locations in 7 countries, from 1990 to 2016.

In  order to curb the rising incidence of chronic kidney disease in the Uddanam region of Andhra Pradesh by getting to and analysing the root causes, the Stop CKDu study kicked off in January 2018 with a team comprising members from The George Institute for Global Health and The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) undertaking field visits in Srikakulam District.

While few, if any, would dispute the importance of paying attention to health inequalities in the process of health reform, in practice, this has proven to be difficult. Thus, even as equity and equality are pivotal aspects of universal health coverage, there is less clarity on how to systematically identify those who are being left out, which is the first in ensuring that they no longer are.

Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of premature death and disability in India. Since access to health services is poor in rural India and Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) are available throughout India for maternal and child health, a potential solution for improving hypertension control is by utilising this available workforce.

Media release: 
17/05/2018

Experts who participated in a roundtable discussion on Progress towards Universal Health Coverage in India made an impassioned plea to the Government for increase in health financing and putting in place governance structures for strategic purchasing to prepare for an efficient roll out of the National Health Protection Scheme (NHPS).

At a time when the government at the Centre has started the process of upgrading primary health centres into comprehensive wellness centres, the George Institute for Global Health India today hosted a roundtable discussion on opportunities and challenges for scaling up primary healthcare in India.

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